Remodeling a finished basement is costlier. The demo can cost from $1,500 to around $3,000 to prep the site. System upgrades include expanding the HVAC and electrical, but even if you already have a bathroom in place, remodeling can add $1,000 to $4,000. Finally, the finishing work can be kept low if you stay with the basics, but upgrades to hardwood floors and other luxuries will add $7,000 to $10,000 to the job. On average, expect to pay $13,200 to $30,500 for this job.


Cork is an eco-friendly flooring material that can be installed over an existing floor or concrete. Cork is derived from the bark of the cork tree, meaning trees are not cut down during harvesting. Cork flooring is durable and has good insulating qualities, but if you choose cork flooring for your basement, make sure you choose a type that is recommended for a basement environment as not all cork flooring is appropriate for basements.

This traditional home basement is redesigned to be an adult’s retreat spot. The game area features a poker table with black leather chairs, the sectional sofa and ottoman by the fire place are made of brown leather and a small counter with bar stools. This entertainment area opens and flows out to the basement’s wine cellar. Decorative stones which are used for accent walls, arch ways and fireplace adds warmth and coziness to the room. Homeowners could entertain many friends in a fun place like this one.

The approximate costs and value of a typical Basement Remodeling project are summarized below. Use higher estimates for larger metropolitan areas and the lower estimates where home prices are below the national average. Adjust costs for substitutions or refinements in the last section. For size differences of up to 25%, scale total costs in direct proportion to the size of your project. Use the adjusted costs as a basis for setting a material budget and for comparing contractor bids (if you choose to have a professional perform the work).
A finished basement is not always the same thing as a designed basement. Sometimes, the basement begins with the basics: walls, a ceiling, lights, and a floor. Gwen Hefner and husband Micah wanted to turn their tiny, airless basement space into a comfortable mancave. They had the basics to start with. The next step, Gwen says, would be a true test to her design skills.
Boys will be boys. This small man-cave basement is fully equipped with the essentials a man would need in his hideaway retreat – a wall dartboard, a bar and a liquor cabinet. Texture painted ceiling in two tone colors and neutral color painted walls are balanced by the medium tone wood stain finish of the cabinetry, doors and bar stools. Wall to wall carpet adds a warmth and welcoming feel to the room.
So you have decided to turn your musty junk-filled basement into a warm liveable space. Or maybe you are already using the basement but want to style it up a notch. Basement design ideas are limitless. Whether you want a cool chic look or a more dramatic themed basement, the choices are endless. But before you decide on the style you want for your new finished basement, here are a few things to consider.
If you decide to go with a pony wall, you may be able to handle the project yourself (saving money). However, if you’re going to expand your house and need to install weight-bearing walls, you’re better off leaving it to the pros. Additionally, you or your pro will need to investigate building codes and local requirements to ensure you comply with structural guidelines.
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